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Yoga

Reduced Health Risks

Kim Innes, a Kundalini Yoga practitioner and a clinical associate professor at the University of Virginia, recently published a study on how yoga may benefit people who have a variety of health risk factors, including being overweight, sedentary, and at risk for type 2 diabetes. Forty-two people who had not practiced yoga within the previous year took part in an eight-week gentle Iyengar Yoga program; at the end of the program, more than 80 percent reported that they felt calmer and had better overall physical functioning. "Yoga is very accessible," Innes says. "Participants in our trials, even those who thought they 'could not do yoga,' noted benefits even after the first session. My belief is that once people are exposed to gentle yoga practice with an experienced yoga therapist, they will likely become hooked very quickly."

Ray of Light

Yoga On Red Couch

Much attention has been given to yoga's potential effect on the persistent dark fog of depression. Lisa Uebelacker, a psychologist at Brown University, got interested in examining yoga as a therapy for depression after studying and practicing mindfulness meditation. Because depressed people tend to be prone to rumination, Uebelacker suspected that seated meditation could be difficult for them to embrace. "I thought yoga might be an easier doorway, because of the movement," she says. "It provides a different focus from worry about the future or regrets about the past. It's an opportunity to focus your attention somewhere else." In a small study in 2007, UCLA researchers examined how yoga affected people who were clinically depressed and for whom antidepressants provided only partial relief. After eight weeks of practicing Iyengar Yoga three times a week, the patients reported significant decreases in both anxiety and depression.

  Shanon Kareil       Friday, 12 Jul 2019       153 Views

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